5 Ways Your Energy Inefficient Home is Draining Your Wallet

Energy efficiency has become a trendy topic as Americans look for ways to minimize their carbon footprint. However, the advantages of building or remodeling a home to be more energy efficient are not only environmental but also financial.

An inefficient home could be costing you substantially through your monthly energy bills, in addition to decreasing the comfort level of your living space and your overall quality of life. While each energy inefficient feature alone may have a negligible impact, the negative effects begin to cumulate if your home on the Wasatch Front possesses two or more.

If you’re suffering from high energy costs, here are five potential culprits:

1. Poor Roofing

When it comes to energy efficiency, it’s best to start from the top down. Consider the state of your roof and how leaks and other damage could be exposing the interior to the elements and affecting your energy bills. If you want to take it a step further, you can consider installing a cool roof, which is made from a material that is designed to reflect off excess sunlight and lower roofing temperatures. In the warm Utah climate, cool roofs are an energy-saving feature that can help reduce energy bills year-round.

2. Outdated Windows

The type of windows installed in a house often ranks high among the reasons for high energy bills among Utah homeowners. Old windows tend to be draftier, allowing 10 percent of airflow to escape, which leads to higher energy costs. Also, the glass within the pane plays a role, as well. Advanced technologies – such as improved frames, protective coatings, and double-pane and low-emissivity (Low-E) windows – will help capture heat during the winter and keep it out during the summer, in addition to blocking UV sunlight that can damage carpets and furniture in the house. Replacing old windows with newer, energy-efficient models is a way to capture energy savings on your home.

3. Old Siding

While there is no ENERGY STAR-certified siding on the market, this feature still contributes to the overall energy efficiency of your home, as certain sidings demonstrate better energy performance than others. How well a building material insulates the interior is known in the industry as its R-value. The higher the R-value, the better the material is at insulating the interior. Wood shingle and beveled wood sidings have some of the highest R-values. Aluminum, steel, and vinyl also perform well and aren’t prone to warping, as wood is. To perform even better, you can install insulated or thermal siding.

4. Lack of Insulation

Your home could be suffering from about 25% energy loss if it contains shoddy roofing insulation or a poorly-insulated attic. Installing a high-quality roof and bolstering the insulation in overhead spaces can help regulate your home’s interior temperatures year-round, leading to reduced energy bills.

5. Outdated Seals

A home that has deteriorating, damaged or missing seals is going to be lacking in the area of energy efficiency. Air sealing is a critical component of a complete thermal enclosure system when it comes to your home, according to the Department of Energy. Reducing the amount of air that leaks in and out of your Utah home is not only an effective way of cut heating and cooling costs, but it also improves the comfort and durability of your home while creating a healthier indoor environment.

Remodeling an Energy Inefficient Home

Begin your journey toward constructing a more energy-efficient home by identifying how your roof could be contributing to high energy costs and other undesirable impacts. At Vertex Roofing, our team of certified professionals can address not only roof repairs and maintenance but also install new roofing material to make your home more green and efficient. Call us today to book an appointment!

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